05.20.16 Swinging Bridge over Big Wood River Deemed Unsafe

SHOSHONE, ID – A broken cable has rendered BLM’s historic swinging Sheep Bridge unsafe for both foot and livestock traffic. The bridge hangs 30 feet above the Big Wood River and connects Timmerman and Bennett Hills with the Wood River Valley at the confluence of Rock Creek. BLM plans to repair the bridge once engineers
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Posted in Current Situation | May 20, 2016 | 4:28 pm

05.20.16 …UNSEASONABLY COLD TEMPERATURES AND MOUNTAIN SNOW EXPECTED…

A LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL BRING UNSEASONABLY COLD CONDITIONS ALONG WITH FREQUENT VALLEY RAIN AND MOUNTAIN SNOW SHOWERS ACROSS THE CENTRAL MOUNTAINS THROUGH THIS WEEKEND. THE HEAVIEST AND MOST PERSISTENT PRECIPITATION IS EXPECTED TO FALL FROM LATE THIS AFTERNOON INTO SATURDAY MORNING. SNOW LEVELS WILL FALL TO AROUND 7000 FEET ELEVATION TODAY…AND TO NEAR 6000
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Posted in Current Situation | May 20, 2016 | 6:52 am

05.18.16 …STRONG THUNDERSTORMS POSSIBLE THURSDAY…

A STRONG COLD FRONT WILL SWEEP ACROSS SOUTHEAST IDAHO THURSDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING. CONDITIONS ALONG AND AHEAD OF THE COLD FRONT WILL BE FAVORABLE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FEW STRONG THUNDERSTORMS WHICH WILL BE CAPABLE OF PRODUCING STRONG WINDS…HAIL…FREQUENT LIGHTNING AND HEAVY RAINFALL. THE GREATEST POTENTIAL FOR THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE ACROSS THE SNAKE PLAIN
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Posted in Current Situation | May 18, 2016 | 7:28 am



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  • noaa1NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards (NWR) is a nationwide network of radio stations broadcasting continuous weather information from the nearest National Weather Service office. NWR broadcasts official noaa_marktrailwarnings, watches, forecasts and other hazard information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

    Working with the Federal Communication Commission’s Emergency Alert System, NWR is an all hazards radio network, making it your single source for comprehensive weather and emergency information.

    In conjunction with emergency managers and other public officials, NWR broadcasts warning and post-event information for all types of hazards including natural events such as earthquakes and avalanches, environmental accidents such as chemical releases or oil spills, and public safety issues such as a child abduction or 911 telephone outage. Please see NWR Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) for Event Codes

    Known as the “Voice of NOAA’s National Weather Service,” NWR is provided as a public service by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, part of the Department of Commerce. NWR numbers 1000 transmitters, covering all 50 states, adjacent coastal waters, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the U.S. Pacific Territories. NWR requires a special radio receiver or scanner capable of picking up the signal.  Broadcasts are found in the VHF public service band at these seven frequencies (MHz) listed below.

    162.400
    162.425
    162.450
    Local Channel
    162.475
    162.500
    162.525
    162.550

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